old jeans to…

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What shall I call this type of pouch?

 

There has to be a better name for this type of bag than ‘bum bag’ or ‘fanny pack’. It is the type that you thread on your belt as a hands free pouch. I am going to call it a Harvey pouch as it is big enough for my dog (Harvey) lead, treats, poo bags, my phone and more.

Materials: I cut a rectangle around the back pocket of some old jeans and a matching rectangle from the leg material plus two strips each three inches wide and about four inches long (to make the belt loops)

I then cut two rectangles from lining material (old duvet, I am being so economic) and a small rectangle to make an inside pocket, then I found a zip the same length as the width of my rectangles – although I could have chopped a longer one down or made a shorter one longer by adding tabs.

To assemble: make the belt loops by folding in the short ends of a strip,  then folding it lengthwise in half and finally folding the long edges into the centre before sewing all the way round the edge of your thin layered strip. Repeat for the other strip then position both on the outer one of the denim rectangles.

I want the jeans pocket with its stud and pattern to be on the front of my bag when it is on the belt so sewed my loops on the plain rectangle that I cut from the leg material. I positioned them nearer the top than the bottom and tried to make them equidistant from the edges, bearing in mind the seam allowance I planned

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The loops were tough to sew on the panel, so many layers of denim . Should have used my walking foot.

I then made the pocket for inside by folding under the raw edges of my pocket piece and top stitching the top edge, then seaming the three other sides to one of my lining pieces.  I positioned the pocket it slightly lower down the panel to keep it out of the way of the zip I was planning. I also ran a seam down the centre of the pocket to make two compartments, each big enough for credit cards.

The zip was sewn, sandwiched between the right sides of an outer and lining rectangle on each side and top stitched before opening out the pieces with lining right sides facing on the left, outer right sides facing on the right and I sewed all the way around leaving a turning gap (yes I remembered to open the zip 3/4s of the way first). I boxed the corners of lining and outer to give the pouch a bit of shape before turning, finishing the lining then flipping the lining inside.

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Not beautiful sewing but it is only the lining!
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Shower soap pockets

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A neat way to use soaps without getting the shower scummy.

Have you lots of soaps in the house although you use shower gel these days? Here is a quick sew to help use them up…

Cut a strip of towelling (or flannel) that is two inches wider than the soap bars you have to use up and three times longer. I cut my towelling so that one edge was ready hemmed, otherwise sew a rolled hem along one width.

Now fold the towel strip in thirds and then ease the folds out to make an envelope shape just bigger than a soap bar. The hemmed edge should be inside the overlap, ready for sewing

Next cut a length of cord to form a hanging loop. Fold the cord in half with the ends sticking outside one side and pin the loop inside so it doesn’t get caught up in your seam sewing

Sew  both open sides with a quarter inch seam allowance,  then turn the envelope inside out so the hemmed fold is now outside and the hanging  loop is showing and you have a little packet to tuck your soap bar in…

After a few showers when the soap has been dispersed and the towel is nicely soapy you can launder and/or tuck in another soap bar … you might even use up those hotel soaps you keep collecting!

reel and bobbin holder

a project on my to do list, finally ticked off thanks to a rainy day

I cadged’ some old golf tees which Edward fixed into an offcut from a floor board. He planed the edges and drilled tee sized recesses in the board before gluing them in place

thanks to yet more rain, he had some time for this project so it isn’t really a jane crafts achievement…

the tees are long enough for cotton and matching bobbin storage leaving my threads tin a bit tidier. Now I can see how many duplicates I have.

Decorated pegs

Makes a useful,  basic and inexpensive tool just a little prettier…

Plain, wooden clothes pegs are useful in the craft room for box making, clamping glued items and stacking papers as well as storing cords and fabrics

Glued on a shelf in the utility room they are great for holding odd socks until their ‘sole mates’ re-appear or holding dog leads out of the way

And in the kitchen they keep packets and bags closed to stop spills

Functional is good but prettified and still functional is even better, so a stamping session took place this week.

Prettified, these pegs will also add a final, rustic touch to attach a tag and close a gift bag.

Maker’s tip: I used a floral stamp and placed it on an acrylic pad, took the ink pad to the stamp and then rested the peg on the stamp to get the right position. It is easier than trying to balance the peg on a work surface then tap your much bigger stamp on top of it.

Use the right ink to avoid smudges and stains- I used stazon – or découpage pretty papers with something like modpodge to keep them durable…

Home milled soap

A simple recipe for gifts with a hand made touch

Grate quality soap into a microwaveable jug. I combined some French milk soap and mini tablets collected from posh hotel stays.

Add a little water (start with a tablespoonful, you can always add more if the mixture is too dry) to soften the mix when you heat it, plus a few drops of almond oil and any dried petals or herbs. 30 seconds max in the microwave and it should almost rise or fluff up so give it a quick stir, then add a couple of drops of essential oil. Stir again before pressing into a silicone tartlet mould.

Leave to cool in the fridge for 30 minutes before unmoulding and wrapping in greaseproof paper.

I added dried lavender harvested in the summer to some of mine, they look very rustic so I made some smart birdhouse boxes on the scan n cut to present them in.

Heat transfer vinyl

Much easier than I expected

I bought the vinyl from Tunnel  Vision and downloaded the visual from lovesvg.com before adding the personalised text on the ScanNCut. I then flipped the virtual visual to give a mirror image and put the vinyl shiny side (ie carrier side) down on the cutting mat before cutting with blade 4 and pressure 1.

the excess vinyl was peeled off the carrier and the remainder (the vinyl I wanted) placed dull side down on the T-shirt (peacocks) and ironed to fix it.  Once cooled the carrier sheet peels off leaving just the image in place.

now, what else can I cover in vinyl?

 

Faux Appliqué book jacket

A corporate note book of quality paper now wrapped in a jacket to keep it safe.

I backed some floral fabric with heat and bond, cut out the flowers then ironed them on a rectangle of denim. I then stitched over the flowers to give a loose quilting effect.

I hemmed the denim so that the height of the fabric matched the book but the width was about six inches wider than the book when opened flat. I then folded matching ends around the cover to make tight fitting flaps. These were slowly top stitched, top and bottom, quite a few layers of denim now, then the book was bent back on itself to slide into place.

Tip: make snug as the material will stretch for a tight fit which is better than bagging.i