Robust drawstring bag

This bag has the drawstring channels stitched on the outside so they create a nice ruffle top

outside fabric one piece (mine was 22 x 9”), lining fabric two inches longer to create the contrast border, two strips of outer fabric about two inches narrower than the width of the bag and three inches high, scrap of contrast fabric backed with heat and bond for appliqué monogram and one metre cord

method: press raw edges of strips under then fold in thirds to create thin channel to thread cord through,

fold outer fabric in half and pin strip to outside about two inches from upper edge on each side – you want there to be an equal ish gap at either side of the bag. Sew top and bottom of both strips in position, leaving sides open

If sewing appliqué monogram, position and stitch now

now turn fabric inside out and seam both sides closed, if you want a boxed bottom cut a 2 inch square  out of each bottom corner and then bag it out

seam lining fabric sides , leave a gap for turning, use same seam allowance as for the outer, and box bottoms or not to match your outer

with right sides of bag and lining together pin upper edges together, match seams. The lining will be a bit baggy as it is longer than the outer, that is deliberate but the top edge of lining and outer should match as you pin it. Sew around the top.

reach through the turning gap and pull the inside out, then push the lining inside the bag so the bases match and the longer lining top poking out. Press. Reach inside and sew up the turning gap in the seam

top stitch around the top, use decorative stitch or hide in the seam if you prefer

cut cording in half, thread from each side all the way round and knot ends to secure

iron appliqué at end if you are using iron on

job done

 

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Personalised cushion

A unique creation made for a particular person!

aiming for a 15″ cushion I cut 3 x 16″ rectangles of red base material, one for my front and two for the back panel

For the decoration I filled a 12″ white fabric panel with heat and bond backed fabric shapes (cut on scan n cut from basic shapes library) and ironed them in place when I was happy with the layout. I then satin stitched around each shape to complete the panel.

I cut four strips of 2″ wide brown fabric – aiming for a wood frame effect and sewed them around the panel then ironed under the raw edge and stitched the whole onto my red front rectangle

to make up the cushion I folded 2″ under and under again on each of the back panels and top stitched the turned hem in place. I put the finished front piece face up and laid the back panels outside down on top so that the hems created overlapped in the centre. With lots of pins to keep everything square, I then sewed a half inch seam around all four sides.

turn inside out, press, job done!

Cutlery pouches


a little something for the Christmas table

I need to use some of my lovely Christmas papers so made up the set of cutlery pouches as a gift for someone I know likes the concept.

I used the docrafts folk Christmas kit. This included sheets of stick on initials.

Method: a 12 x 12 sheet is cut into three strips, each 4 inches wide. Each strip is folded at 8 inches to create a front flap half the height of the back. The sides of the pouch are stuck down with thin double sided tape

A belly band is created by cutting a 1 inch strip from some contrast paper, the strip wrapped round the pouch and fixed with double sided tape

A square (with corners rounded) of scrap paper is stuck over the join in the belly band and an initial stuck on the square

I used border patterns from my scan n cut to give top and bottom of each sheet a scallop edge but a border punch or pinking scissors would also work.

Four sheets of paper made nine pouches including belly bands and trim and a set of spare initials was included to cater for a range of guests.

Up cycle peg bag

scan n cut to decorate my tablecloth to peg bag project

the old oilcloth tablecloth has been taking up space in my fabric pile and all I can think of using it for is peg bags, any ideas?

I used a smallish plastic hanger ( note to self remember to keep hangers when next buying stuff in m&s as stash now depleted) and traced around the width of the hanger on the reverse of my oilcloth. I gave myself a half inch seam allowance and some wriggle room as the oilcloth doesn’t stretch.

The fabric length was cut at one and a half times the planned length of the bag (this gave me the back and folded up to make the bottom of the bag front.  When this piece was cut I folded it in half lengthwise to check it was symmetrical

To get the top front of the bag a separate piece of fabric was cur to match the width and shape of the back piece but length to just more than half of the planned bag size.

I planned the cutting  so the cut pieces finished on the bias bound edge of my tablecloth. This saved a hemming step. (That is why the right edge of my front does a little bend in the picture, I thought it would look stylish, actually it just looks wobbly).

The two pieces were stitched wrong sides together leaving a small gap to put the hanger through. I then Turned them  right sides out and creases were finger smoothed out (even a cool iron melted a prototype).

I cut shapes from external use vinyl on the scan n cut to decorate (and cover the iron damage on my prototype) and trust the project will enjoy a good second life somewhere

 

No sew appliqué

scan n cut with heat and bond made this a doddle

this old pillow sis in the dog basket I made some while back. It needs an upgrade and I wanted to practice my scan n cut fabric cutting technique in it. The pillow and case are standard ones recycled to the dog bed so a bit of no sew appliqué does the upgrade and helps me practise for other projects.

simple instructions

iron heat and bond onto a piece of lightweight cotton. Mine was about 10″ by 6″ , I chose plain black because of the type style bit white on a patterned pillowcase  would work as well

peel off the paper backing and press on the scan n cut mat, set blade to 4, pressure and speed to  4 , let the machine cut out the design then peel fabric from the sheet

position the design on the ironed pillowcase, I used a ruler to line the letters up – I forgot I have some transfer tape to try out

when in desired position, cover with a cloth and hot iron to seal in place

Paper flowers in a woolly vase

Wet day and the window ledge needed cheering up, so a vase of flowers was created without stepping outside

Six pinwheel flowers were cut on the scan n cut with BBQ matches for stalks and buttons for centres. I used blue themed floral  papers to match the ‘vase’ (and my mood as the rain seemed endless)

The vase was a can found from recycling with a ball of wool wrapped round it. Most wraps were made round the middle to give a rounded shape and a few strands of contrast wool wrapped around the top and tied in a bow for decoration

The can was filled with out of date dried pasta shapes (mini alphabets) so I could spread the stalks outside

Maybe a few leaves would finish this off?

Cutting fabric on the scan n cut

I have struggled to get the settings right, but may finally have sorted fabric cutting on  the scan n cut

cut speed four, blade four, pressure four on light cotton that has had heat n bond or bondaweb fused on the back and the paper peeled off i.e. stuck wrong side down directly on the mat

the fabric peeled easily off from the mat and was just ironed on to the suedette drawstring bag: hot iron- no steam and with an ironing cloth for protection

so here I have decorated some glasses bags in a festive style so they can be given another life as gift bags later this year